Siena Farms Kids’ Share 2016, Week 7: Preserving and Pickling

October 17, 2016

Before we had refrigerators, people had to figure out ways they could store vegetables so they last longer. People learned that pickling (and making jams) were ways they could keep and eat their vegetables in the winter, when many fresh produce weren’t available.

Luckily, we have refrigerators and fully stocked grocery stores to get us through the winter, but we still love learning about ways to preserve our fruits and vegetables. This week’s share included Hakurei Turnips, Red-Ace Beets, Green & Ripe Bell Peppers, Hungarian Hot Wax Peppers, Garlic, Kennebec Potatoes, Carrots, Dill, and a quart-size mason jar. We decided to make a Siena Farms recipe, which turned out to be colorful and tasty—check it out!

 

Dilly Carrot + Turnip Pickles 
From Siena Farms.

Quick-pickles that are easy to make and tasty too. They’ll add zip to sandwiches and colorful crunch to potato or egg salad.

Makes 1 quart.

Kitchen Gear:
Cutting board
Sharp knife
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons
Colander or sieve
Large bowl
Small saucepan
Quart jar

Ingredients:
3 ½ cups of carrot and Harukei turnip slices
5-6 stems fresh dill
3 large garlic cloves, peeled, cut into chunks
1 ½ tablespoons kosher salt
¼ cup plus 1 teaspoon organic sugar
1 ¼ cups white wine vinegar
½ cup water
2 teaspoons brown mustard seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds

Instructions:

  1. Wash and dry a quart canning jar and its lid and set it aside.
  2. Put the vegetable slices into a large bowl. Add the salt and 1 teaspoon of sugar. Stir and toss to mix the salt and sugar with the vegetables. Set aside for 45 minutes. (You’ll see a lot of liquid in the bottom of the bowl, which is supposed to happen.)
  3. Pour the vegetables into a strainer set in the sink. Fill the bowl with cold, clean water, dump the vegetables back into it and swish them around. Pour them back into the strainer. Repeat this once more.
  4. Put the drained vegetables onto a clean tea towel. Roll up the towel, gently pressing on the vegetables to dry them a bit more. Use tongs or clean hands to put the vegetables and dill into the jar.
  5. Put the vinegar, water, mustard, and coriander, garlic, and remaining sugar into a small pan set over medium-high heat until boiling. (You can boil the mixture in the microwave, instead, if you’d prefer.)
  6. Carefully pour the vinegar mixture into the jar of vegetables. Screw the lid onto the jar fairly tightly. Let the jar cool on the counter, and then stow it in the fridge. Your pickles will be ready to eat the next day.

If you want to try more pickling recipe, try ChopChop’s Easy Dill Pickles recipe.